Cultural change in spatial environments: The role of cultural assimilation and of internal changes in cultures

A cellular automata model is used to study aspects of cultural change in spatial environments. Culture are represented as bit strings in individual cells. Cultures may change because they become more similar to prevailing nearby cultures, are subject to intrinsic random changes, or expand to previously empty cells. Extending Axelrod's (1997) results, the authors show that assimilation does not lead to a single homogeneous culture even if, unlike Axelrod's model, culturall assimilation may take place even between neighboring cells with zero similarity; intrinsic changes decrease rather than increase the number of stablecultural regions; and expansion of a single culture in a previously unoccupied territory does not result in a single culture in the entire territory. Geographical features (such as mountains) that are an obstacle to contact between cells increase the number of different cultural regions.

Publication type: 
Articolo
Author or Creator: 
Parisi D.
Cecconi F.
Natale F.
Source: 
47 (2003): 163–179.
info:cnr-pdr/source/autori:Parisi D., Cecconi F., Natale F./titolo:Cultural change in spatial environments: The role of cultural assimilation and of internal changes in cultures/doi:/rivista:/anno:2003/pagina_da:163/pagina_a:179/intervallo_pagine:163–179/
Date: 
2003
Resource Identifier: 
http://www.cnr.it/prodotto/i/46717
ISTC Author: 
Francesco Natale's picture
Real name: 
Federico Cecconi's picture
Real name: